Treatments for Erectile Dysfunction

Oral Treatments

What is Cialis?
Cialis (tadalafil) belongs to a group of medicines called PDE5 inhibitors. It is an almond shaped yellow tablet with strengths of 10mg or 20mg. It is an oral tablet, which is swallowed. It is not an aphrodisiac and does not increase sexual desire. For Cialis to be effective, sexual stimulation is required.

How does Cialis work?

Cialis works by helping the blood vessels in the penis to relax, allowing blood to flow into the penis causing an erection. For Cialis to be effective, sexual stimulation is required. Men who do not have erectile dysfunction should not take Cialis.

How do you take Cialis?

Cialis is available in two strengths - 10mg and 20mg. The recommended starting dose is 10mg but your doctor may decide to start with 20mg depending upon your circumstances. The maximum dose is once per day. The tablet should be swallowed whole prior to anticipated sexual activity. The amount of time it takes to work varies from person to person. Within 30 minutes approximately 50% of men can get an erection if sexually stimulated. The ability to respond to sex stimulation can last for up to 36 hours.
This period of responsiveness can allow you to distance the taking of the medicine from the sexual activity.
Food and moderate amounts of alcohol do not interfere with the effectiveness of Cialis and as such it can be taken with or without food. Remember, alcohol consumption can diminish sexual performance. Therefore in order to get the maximum benefit from the medication it is advisable not to drink large amounts of alcohol.

What side effects may be associate with Cialis?

The manufacturers have tested the drug in over 3,000 patients in 16 clinical trials. When taken at the recommended dose, side effects are mild and transient. The most common side effects are headache and indigestion. Less common effects include flushing, stuffy nose, myalgia, dizziness and back ache.

Who cannot take Cialis?

Patients who are taking any medicines containing nitrates. These are commonly prescribed for the relief of angina (chest pain). Cialis, in combination with nitrates, can lower blood pressure significantly leading to untoward effects. Patients should inform their doctor if they are taking any of these medicines or should ask if they are uncertain.
Patients with the following:

  • Patients who are using riociguat should not use Cialis
  • Known hypersensitivity to any component of the drug Cialis
  • Men with cardiac disease of a severity where sex is inadvisable
  • Myocardial infarction (heart attack) in the last 90 days
  • Unstable angina or angina occurring during sexual intercourse
  • Significant heart failure in the last 6 months
  • Uncontrolled arrhythmias, low or untreated high blood pressure
  • Stroke within the last 6 months
  • Cialis should not be taken with other erectile dysfunction treatments

What conditions may prevent a man using CIALIS?

Cialis should be used with caution in patients with:

  • An abnormally formed penis.
  • Diseases that might result in prolonged erection e.g. sickle cell anaemia (an abnormality of red blood cells), multiple myeloma (cancer of bone marrow) or leukaemia (cancer of blood cells).
  • Bleeding disorders (such as haemophilia) or peptic ulceration (stomach ulcer).


Can women take Cialis?

Cialis should not be taken by women as its safety in women has not been tested.

What happens if I increase the dose?

An increase in dose should always occur under close medical supervision. The recommended starting dose is 10mg. In people in whom 10mg does not produce an adequate effect, 20mg can be tried.
Clinical trials have shown that increasing the dose beyond the maximum recommended dose of 20mg simply increases the side effects and not the efficacy.

Can I drive while taking CIALIS?

The potential for Cialis to influence the ability to drive or operate machinery is expected to be negligible but patients should be aware of how they react to Cialis before undertaking such activity.

Levitra is a new oral treatment for erectile dysfunction (impotence). This factsheet provides basic information on Levitra.

What is LEVITRA?

Levitra (vardenafil) belongs to a group of medicines called PDE5 inhibitors. It is a round shaped orange tablet with strengths of 5mg, 10mg or 20mg. It is an oral tablet, which is swallowed. It is not an aphrodisiac and does not increase sexual desire. For Levitra to be effective, sexual stimulation is required.

How does LEVITRA work?

Levitra works by helping to relax the blood vessels in the penis, allowing blood to flow into the penis causing an erection. Levitra will not give a man an erection spontaneously; it will only help a man to get an erection if he is sexually stimulated.

How do you take LEVITRA?

Levitra is available in three strengths 5mg, 10mg and 20mg. The initial dose is selected by the doctor who will assess the most appropriate dose for each patient based on a consultation.
Levitra normally works within 25-60 minutes, although some men will achieve an erection within 15 minutes. Within a 5 hour period after taking the tablet an erection should occur in response to sexual stimulation.
The action of Levitra is not generally affected by eating before taking the treatment (except where the meal has a fat content of 57% or greater) or by drinking alcohol, so men can eat or drink as they would normally before taking Levitra. It is recommended that only one dose of Levitra is taken in a 24 hour period.

What side effects may be associated with LEVITRA?

The manufacturers have tested the drug in over 3,750 men in worldwide clinical trials. When taken at the recommended dose, side effects are mild and transient. The most common side effects are headache and facial flushing.

Who cannot take LEVITRA?

Patients who are taking any medicines containing nitrates. These are commonly prescribed for the relief of angina (chest pain). Levitra, in combination with nitrates, can lower blood pressure significantly leading to untoward effects. Patients should inform their doctor if they are taking any of these medicines or should ask if they are uncertain.
Patients with the following:

  • Known hypersensitivity to any component of the drug Levitra;
  • Men with cardiac disease of a severity where sex is inadvisable;
  • Recent stroke, heart attack or low blood pressure;
  • Unstable angina or angina occurring during sexual intercourse;
  • Aged over 75 years and taking ritonavir, indinavir, ketoconazole or itraconazole (oral form)

Levitra should not be taken with other erectile dysfunction treatments.

What conditions may prevent a man using LEVITRA?

Levitra should be used with caution in patients with:

  • An abnormally formed penis.
  • Diseases that might result in prolonged erections e.g. Sickle cell anaemia, multiple myeloma, or leukaemia.
  • A history of postural hypotension.
  • Severe kidney or liver disease.

Can women take LEVITRA?

Levitra should not be taken by women as it is not licensed and its safety in women has not been tested.

What happens if I increase the dose?

An increase in dose should always occur under close medical supervision. Clinical trials have shown that increasing the dose beyond the maximum recommended dose of 20mg simply increases the side effects and not the efficacy.

Can I drive while taking LEVITRA?

As dizziness has been reported in clinical trials of Levitra, patients should be aware of how they react to the drug before they drive.

Will it work for everyone?

If Levitra does not help you to get an erection, or your erection does not last long enough for you to complete your chosen sexual activity you should tell your doctor, who will be able to advise you as to whether a dose increase is necessary to reach the desired effect. Your doctor can also advise you on other possible treatment options.

SPEDRA (avanafil) is a 2nd generation oral treatment for erectile dysfunction (impotence). This fact sheet provides basic information on SPEDRA; for more detailed information you should consult your doctor.

What is SPEDRA?

SPEDRA belongs to a group of medications called phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. It is a pale yellow, oval shaped, oral tablet prescribed to treat men suffering from clinical erectile dysfunction. It is not an aphrodisiac and does not increase libido. In order for SPEDRA to be effective, sexual stimulation is required.

How does SPEDRA work?

SPEDRA works by helping the blood vessels in your penis to relax. This increases the blood flow into your penis, helping it stay hard and erect when you get sexually excited. Men who do not suffer from erectile dysfunction should not take SPEDRA.

How do you take SPEDRA?

SPEDRA is available in three dosages - 50mg, 100mg and 200mg. The recommended dose is 100 mg, but your doctor may decide to start with the 200mg. SPEDRA should be taken approximately 15 to 30 minutes before sexual intercourse. The amount of time it takes to work varies from person to person, but most men who are responsive to SPEDRA experience effects within approximately 15 minutes of dosing. Effects of SPEDRA are seen beyond 6 hours after pill intake, too. SPEDRA can be taken with or without food; if taken with food, it may take longer to work. Although SPEDRA clinical trials have been conducted without any restriction on food or alcohol consumption, drinking alcohol at the same time as taking SPEDRA may increase your heart rate and lower your blood pressure. Alcohol can temporarily decrease your ability to get an erection. SPEDRA should not be taken more than once a day.

What side effects may be associated with SPEDRA?

The manufacturers have tested the drug on nearly 2,500 men in 4 clinical trials. When taken at the recommended doses some side effects have been reported although they were generally mild and transient. In clinical trials SPEDRA did not present very common side effects. Common reported side effects were headache, flushing and nasal congestion. Uncommon side effects included dizziness, sinus congestion, dyspepsia and back pain.

Who cannot take SPEDRA?

Patients who are taking any medications containing nitrates. These medications are commonly prescribed for relief of angina pectoris (chest pain). SPEDRA can increase the effects of these drugs and severely lower blood pressure. Patients should inform their Doctor if they are taking any of these medications or ask if they are not certain.
Patients with the following:

  • Known hypersensitivity to any component of the drug SPEDRA
  • Myocardial infarction, stroke or life-threatening arrhythmia within the last 6 months
  • Taking medicines for HIV or AIDS such as ritonavir, indinavir, saquinavir, nelfinavir or atazanavir
  • Taking medicines for fungal infections (ketoconazole, itraconazole or voriconazole) or certain antibiotics for bacterial infections (clarithromycin or telithromycin).
  • Hypotension or hypertension not controlled by medicines.
  • Severe hepatic or renal impairment.
  • Unstable angina or angina occurring during sexual intercourse.
  • Hereditary degenerative retinal disorders (such as retinitis pigmentosa).
  • Taking riociguat. PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to increase the hypotensive effects of this medicine.
  • SPEDRA should not be taken together with other erectile dysfunction treatments such as sildenafil, tadalafil or vardenafil

What conditions may prevent a man using SPEDRA?

Spedra should be used with caution in patients with:

  • An abnormally formed penis (such as angulation, Peyronie’s disease or cavernosal fibrosis).
  • Diseases that might result in prolonged erection e.g. sickle cell disease (an abnormality of red blood cells), multiple myeloma (cancer of bone marrow) or leukaemia (cancer of blood cells).
  • Bleeding disorders (such as haemophilia) or active peptic ulceration (stomach ulcer).

Can women take SPEDRA?

SPEDRA should not be taken by women as its safety in women has not been tested.

What happens if I increase the dose?

An increase in dose should always occur under medical recommendation. The recommended dose is 100mg. Based on individual efficacy and tolerability, the doctor could increase the dose to a maximum dose of 200mg or decrease to 50mg. Clinical trials have shown that increasing the dose beyond the maximum recommended dose of 200mg increases the side effects, but not the efficacy.

Can I drive while taking SPEDRA?

SPEDRA has minor influence on the ability to drive or use machines, but patients should be aware or how they react to SPEDRA before undertaking such activities.

VIAGRA (sildenafil) was the first oral treatment for erectile dysfunction (impotence) to be licensed. This fact sheet provides basic information on VIAGRA; for more detailed information you should consult your doctor.

What is VIAGRA?

VIAGRA belongs to a group of medicines called phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. It is a blue, diamond shaped, oral tablet prescribed to treat men suffering from clinical erectile dysfunction. It is not an aphrodisiac and does not increase libido. VIAGRA has no effect in the absence of sexual stimulation.

How does VIAGRA work?

VIAGRA works by helping to relax the blood vessels in the penis, allowing blood to flow into the penis causing an erection. However, it will only help a man to get an erection if he is sexually stimulated. It should not be taken by men who do not have erectile dysfunction.

How do you take VIAGRA?

VIAGRA is available in three strengths - 25mg, 50mg and 100mg. The initial dose is selected by the doctor. VIAGRA should be swallowed whole with some water about an hour before anticipated sexual activity. The amount of time it takes to work varies from person to person, but on average it takes between 20 minutes to one hour. Within a 4 to 6 hour period after taking the tablet an erection should occur in response to sexual stimulation. A man may find that VIAGRA takes longer to work if taken with a heavy meal. Alcohol consumption can temporarily interfere with the erection process. To get the maximum benefit from the medication it is advisable not to drink large amounts of alcohol before taking VIAGRA. VIAGRA should not be used more than once a day. Do not take VIAGRA with other medicines unless your doctor tells you that you can.

What side effects may be associated with VIAGRA?

The manufacturers have tested the drug on nearly 4,000 men during 21 clinical trials. When taken at the recommended doses some side effects have been reported although they were generally mild to moderate and brief in length. The most common side effects are headache and facial flushing. Less commonly reported are indigestion, dizziness, stuffy nose and effects on vision (predominantly a blue colour tinge to vision and increased brightness of light or blurred vision).

Who cannot take VIAGRA?

Patients who are taking any medicines containing nitrates. These medicines are commonly prescribed for relief of angina pectoris "chest pain". In combination with VIAGRA they could seriously lower blood pressure. Patients should inform their Doctor if they are taking any of these medicines or ask if they are not certain.

Patients with the following:

  • Patients who are using riociguat should not use VIAGRA
  • Known hypersensitivity to any component of the drug VIAGRA.
  • Severe heart or liver problem.
  • Recent stroke, heart attack, or low blood pressure.
  • Certain rare inherited eye diseases (such as retinitis pigmentosa).
  • VIAGRA should not be taken in combination with other erectile dysfunction treatments.

What conditions may prevent a man using VIAGRA?

  • An abnormally formed penis.
  • Diseases that might result in prolonged erection e.g. sickle cell anaemia (an abnormality of red blood cells), multiple myeloma (cancer of bone marrow) or leukaemia (cancer of blood cells).
  • Bleeding disorders (such as haemophilia) or peptic ulceration (stomach ulcer).

Can women take VIAGRA?

VIAGRA should not be taken by women. It is not licensed for use in women and it's safety in women has not been tested.

What happens if I increase the dose?
An increase in dose should always occur under close medical supervision. Clinical trials have shown that increasing the drug beyond the maximum recommended dose of 100mg simply increases the side effects and not the efficacy.

Can I drive while taking VIAGRA?

VIAGRA can cause dizziness and effects on vision. Patients should be aware of how they react to the drug before they drive or operate machinery.

Will it work for everyone?

If VIAGRA does not help you to get an erection, or your erection does not last long enough for you to complete your chosen sexual activity you should tell your doctor, who will be able to help. There are other effective treatment options available and information can be obtained from your doctor

What is UPRIMA?

Uprima (Apomorphine Hydrochloride) is a light brown pentagon (2mg) or triangle (3mg) shaped tablet. It is designed to be taken orally by placing the tablet under the tongue, where it dissolves in about 10 minutes. It is not an aphrodisiac and does not increase sexual desire. For Uprima to be effective sexual stimulation is required.

How does UPRIMA work?

Uprima is placed under the tongue, where it dissolves and is absorbed. It then acts on a specific area in the brain known to be involved in the erectile process. Here it works via the body's natural signalling pathways and acts to enhance the signals which allow an erection to occur.

How do you take UPRIMA?

Uprima will be available in two strengths - 2mg and 3mg. The recommended starting dose is 2mg. Before taking Uprima it is advised to drink a small amount of water, this helps the tablet to dissolve. The tablet should then be placed under the tongue. In the majority of men the tablet will be completely dissolved within 10 minutes (if any residual amount remains in the mouth after 20 minutes It may be swallowed). If the tablet is swallowed immediately it will not be effective.

The amount of time it takes Uprima to work varies from person to person, but on average it takes between 10 minutes to 20 minutes.

Uprima dissolves under the tongue and is absorbed in the mouth; therefore the ability of the tablet to work and the time it takes to work is not affected by food/meals.

Alcohol consumption can diminish sexual performance. Therefore in order to get the maximum benefit from the medication it is advisable not to drink large amounts of alcohol before taking Uprima

What side effects may be associated with UPRIMA?

The manufacturers have tested the drug on over 5,000 men during 21 clinical trials. When taken at the recommended doses some side effects have been reported although they were generally mild and transient. The most common side effects are nausea, headache and dizziness.

Who cannot take UPRIMA?

Patients with the following:

  • Known hypersensitivity to any component of the drug Uprima
  • Severe unstable angina.
  • Recent heart attack.
  • Severe heart failure or low blood pressure.
  • Other conditions where sexual activity is inadvisable.
  • In combination with other centrally-acting dopamine agonists or antagonists.

What conditions may prevent a man using UPRIMA?

Uprima should be used with caution in patients with:

  • An abnormally formed penis (such as angulation, cavernosal fibrosis or Peyronie's Disease).
  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure, low blood pressure
  • A history of postural hypotension.
  • Compromised renal or hepatic function.
  • Patients taking medication for high blood pressure, nitrate medications.

Can women take UPRIMA?

Uprima should not be taken by women as its safety in women has not been tested.

What happens if I increase the dose?

The recommended starting dose for Uprima is 2mg. The dose may increase on subsequent administrations to 3mg if necessary to reach the desired clinical effect. Clinical trials have shown that increasing the dose beyond the maximum recommended dose of 3mg simply increases the side effects and not the efficacy.

Can I drive while taking UPRIMA?

Uprima can cause dizziness and light-headedness, therefore patients should not drive for at least 2 hours after taking Uprima or until such symptoms are fully resolved.

Will UPRIMA work for everyone?

If Uprima does not help you get the desired clinical effect you should tell your doctor, who will be able to advise you as to whether a dose increase on subsequent administrations to 3mg is necessary to reach the desired clinical effect. Your doctor can also advise you on other possible treatment options.

Other Treatments

Developed in the United States of America, MUSE is another of the treatments available for erectile dysfunction (impotence). This fact sheet provides basic information on MUSE; for more detailed information you should consult your doctor.

What is MUSE?

MUSE is short for "Medicated Urethral System for Erection". This treatment is based on the discovery that the urethra (the tube passing from the bladder to the tip of the penis through which urine is passed and semen ejaculated) can absorb certain medications, which can then pass into the surrounding erectile tissue creating an erection.

What medication is used in MUSE?

The active ingredient in MUSE is alprostadil. This is identical to a naturally occurring substance within the penis which is involved in the development of an erection. Alprostadil has been used in the treatment of impotence for many years. Before the introduction of MUSE it had to be injected into the penis when an erection was wanted. Alprostadil relaxes the muscles in the erectile tissue of the penis allowing increased blood flow, the basis of a normal erection.

What is involved in this form of treatment?

In MUSE, alprostadil is formulated as a small pellet which is supplied in a specially designed applicator. Each MUSE applicator is individually foil wrapped. The applicator has a narrow stem which can be introduced easily into the urethra. After inserting the applicator, the alprostadil pellet is then released into the urethra by depressing a button on the top of the applicator.
The manufacturer recommends that immediately prior to insertion of MUSE, the man urinates and then gently shakes the penis several times to remove excess urine. A moist urethra makes administration of MUSE easier and facilitates the absorption of alprostadil.

How soon after using MUSE does erection occur?

An erection usually occurs within five to ten minutes of administration.

How long will the erection last?

When this form of treatment is effective, an erection generally lasts 30 to 60 minutes. Extremely rarely a prolonged erection may occur. MUSE can be used twice in any 24 hour period, however 2 units should not be used consecutively.

Different doses:
MUSE is available in four strengths - 125 mcg, 250 mcg, 500 mcg and 1,000 mcg. The initial dose is selected by the doctor.

What side effects may be associated with MUSE?

Side effects have been reported only infrequently. When first using MUSE, some men experience minor discomfort from insertion but prior urination will reduce the chance of this happening.
Following the first dose of MUSE, fainting has occurred, but only in an extremely small proportion of men. However, for this reason, it is recommended that the first dose of MUSE should be in the doctor's office.

Other side effects that have been reported, albeit extremely rarely, include light-headedness, dizziness, fainting, rapid pulse and swelling of the leg veins. Patients are advised not to drive up to one hour after using MUSE.

Are there any side effects in the female partner?

Mild vaginal itching and burning have been reported.

What conditions may prevent a man using MUSE?

MUSE should not be used in the following conditions:

  • Known hypersensitivity (allergy) to alprostadil
  • An abnormally formed penis
  • Diseases that might result in prolonged erection (e.g. sickle cell anaemia or trait, leukaemia, multiple myeloma).
  • MUSE should not be used for sexual intercourse with a pregnant woman unless a condom is used.

How can I obtain MUSE?

MUSE is available only on prescription. You should discuss this form of treatment with your doctor who may prescribe it for you or refer you to a specialist.

It is important to discuss with your doctor or specialist which treatment is right for you. Bear in mind that you and your partner will want a treatment that is acceptable to both of you and perhaps more importantly gives you the confidence in the results it will provide.

Injection treatments for Erectile Dysfunction (impotence) have been used for many years to successfully help men achieve an erection suitable for intercourse. This fact sheet provides basic information on injection therapies, for more detailed information you should consult your doctor.

What is Injection Therapy?

Intracavernosal injection treatments were first discovered in the 1980s when it was found that certain drugs could be injected into the penis to stimulate an erection. This discovery not only led to a greater understanding of how an erection happens but also offered an effective treatment for men with ED.

Various different injection systems are available to help you to prepare and inject your treatment. Injection therapy is usually dispensed as a dry sterile powder and dilutent, which need to be mixed before use. It is important that you take time to learn how to administer your injection. Your doctor, nurse or specialist can help you with this. Most patients find that doing the injection is fairly easy and not painful.

How does it work?

Injection therapy normally uses drugs that will relax the blood vessels feeding blood into the penis allowing the blood flow to increase. At the same time a relaxation of the muscle layers surrounding the erectile bodies allows them to expand preventing the flow of blood out of the penis, helping to maintain an erection.

Why an injection?

To have this effect in a very controlled way the drug should be delivered directly into the erectile body. The most effective way of doing this is by injection.

What medication is used in injection therapy?

The first drugs commonly used in the UK - papaverine and phentolamine were unlicensed for this form of treatment and have been superseded by licensed drugs that are designed to be more predictable and easier to use.

The most commonly used drug is alprostadil. This is identical to a substance called prostaglandin-E 1 that occurs naturally in the penis and is involved in the natural erection process. AIprostadil relaxes the blood vessels and muscles in the erectile tissue of the penis allowing increased blood flow, the basis of a normal erection.

How soon after using an injection will an erection occur?

An erection will normally develop in 10 to 15 minutes and should be hard enough for you and your partner to enjoy normal sexual activity again.

How long will the erection last?

An erection that lasts for approximately 60 minutes will normally occur if this form of treatment is effective.

Getting the dose right

The initial dose is selected by your doctor. It is important to use the correct dose and this should only be adjusted on agreement with your doctor or specialist. An overdose might lead to a prolonged erection. A prolonged erection or priapism (a painful erection lasting for over 4 hours) may occur in a small percentage of treated men. This condition may be treated in the first instance by exercise - running up and down stairs or using a bicycle. Should an erection last more than four hours you should seek medical advice without delay. Failure to seek medical advice may lead to permanent impotence.

What side effects might be associated with injection therapy?

Some men experience penile pain after injecting. In rare cases a prolonged erection might occur. Some men develop a nodule in the penis, however this may disappear with a short break from injections. Permanent nodules may occur in a small percentage of men with long term usage. This can sometimes be avoided by alternating the injection site.

Are there any side-effects on the partner?

No side effects have been reported in the partner. (AIprostadil is normally broken down quickly in the penis).

What conditions prevent a man using injection therapy?

Injection therapy should not be used in the following conditions: known hypersensitivity (allergy) to alprostadil; an abnormally formed penis; Peyronie's Disease; angulation; cavernosal fibrosis; patients with a penile implant; in diseases that might result in a prolonged erection (sickle cell anaemia or trait, leukaemia, multiple myeloma); patients in whom sexual activity is inadvisable.

How can I get injection therapy?

These drugs are available only on prescription from your doctor. Injectable alprostadil is available in the UK as Caverject® or Viridal Duo® / Viridal®. You should discuss this form of treatment with your doctor who may prescribe it or refer you to a specialist clinic.

Injectable treatment is a widely used and effective means of treating erectile dysfunction in many men. Your doctor will discuss the range of treatments available and decide with you, which is most suitable for you to resume your normal sexual activity. Injection therapy is one of the range of treatments that may be offered to you. You should always discuss with your doctor, which is most appropriate for you.

Finding a satisfying solution to erectile dysfunction can be a life-changing event for many men and their partners. Research shows penile implants are more satisfying than other common treatment options. Penile implants were found to be much more satisfying than both pills and injection treatments in one recent study (Rajpurkar A, Dhabuwala C.Comparison of Satisfaction Rates and Erectile Function. J Urol. 2003 July; 170: 159-163)

Benefits and Risks* of Penile Implant Surgery

Penile implants have helped over 300,000 men return to an active, satisfying sex life. But like any surgical procedure, there are both benefits and risks to be considered.

Benefits

  • Offers a permanent, long-term solution to erectile dysfunction
  • Provides the ability to have an erection anytime you choose
  • Allows for greater spontaneity — have sex when the mood strikes
  • Enables you to maintain an erection as long as you desire
  • Eliminates the need for costly pills or shots
  • Feels natural to you and your partner
  • Does not interfere with ejaculation or orgasm

Risks*

  • May cause permanent loss of ability to achieve an erection
  • If an infection occurs, the implant may have to be removed
  • May cause the penis to become shorter, curved or scarred
  • In rare cases, may cause lasting pain
  • In rare cases, there may be mechanical failures

*For a complete list of possible risks associated with implant surgery consult your doctor.

Types of Penile Implants

Choosing the penile implant that's best for you is a very personal decision. Because each type of implant offers unique features, you will want to discuss the choices with your partner in order to choose the most satisfying option.

One-piece Positionable Implants

One-piece positionable implants are the simplest types of penile prostheses. The device is surgically inserted into the penis. The implant is positioned up for intercourse or down for everyday activities.

Advantages

  • Easy for you and your partner to use
  • Good option for men with limited dexterity
  • Generally the simplest surgical procedure
  • Least expensive type of penile implant
  • Totally concealed in body

Disadvantages

  • Remains firm when not erect
  • Must be bent down to conceal
  • Less appropriate for patients requiring repeated cystoscopy

Three-piece Inflatable Implants

The three-piece inflatable implant features an additional reservoir implanted under the abdominal muscles designed to send more fluid to the penis, resulting in a larger, firmer erection.

Advantages

  • Acts and feels more like a natural erection
  • Expands the girth of the penis
  • More firm and full than other prosthetic erections
  • When deflated, it feels softer and more flaccid
  • Totally concealed in body

Disadvantages

  • Requires some manual dexterity
  • Possibility of leakage or malfunction
  • Possibility of unintentional erections

Patient and Partner Satisfaction

Studies like the ones below show that penile implants offer the satisfying results that so many couples seek. Consult your physician to determine which type of implant is best suited to your condition and lifestyle.

  • Kearse WS Jr, Sago AL, Peretsman SJ, Bolton JO,Holcomb RG, Reddy PK, Bernard PH, Eppel SM, Lewis JH, Gladshteyn M,Melman AA.
    Report of a multicenter clinical evaluation of the Dura II penile prosthesis. Journal of Urology May 1996 v. 155 p. 1613-161
  • Ferguson KH, Cespedes RD. Prospective long-term results and quality-of-life assessment after Dura II penile prosthesis placement. Urology 2003 v. 61 p. 437-441
  • Levine LA, Estrada CR, Morgentaler A.Mechanical reliability and safety of, and patient satisfaction with the Ambicor inflatable penile prosthesis; results of a 2 center study. J Urol. 2001 Sep; 166 (3): 932-7
  • F. Montorsi. et al. AMS Three-piece Inflatable Implants for Erectile Dysfunction:A Long-Term Multi-Institution Study in 200 Consecutive Patients: Eur Urol. 2000; 37: 50-55 88% of patients would recommend the AMS DURA II Positionable Implant to a friend.